THREE ARTISTS, ONE SHOW                                               PAINTING EXHIBITION: JUNE 1- JULY 31, 2017

 

WELCOMING RECEPTION

THURSDAY JUNE 15, 2017

  5:30 - 8:00 pm

                                                                                                                                Madron Gallery welcomes                                     JOHN A. KURTZ        PAUL LAMANTIA        MEL THEOBALD   John A. Kurtz, Paul Lamantia and Mel Theobald are MADRON GALLERY's featured artist this summer. Though their styles are very distinct, the three do have things in common, notably that they’re Chicagoans who came of age during the turbulent 1960s. Their art certainly reflects the excitement and individual thinking that took hold in that era. Kurtz, Lamantia and Theobald are also friends who’ve known each other a long time and studied at the Art Institute together. Their collective works, though varied and highly individual, share one important quality: Strength.  

                                                               

                                                                Madron Gallery welcomes

                                    JOHN A. KURTZ        PAUL LAMANTIA        MEL THEOBALD

 

John A. Kurtz, Paul Lamantia and Mel Theobald are MADRON GALLERY's featured artist this summer. Though their styles are very distinct, the three do have things in common, notably that they’re Chicagoans who came of age during the turbulent 1960s. Their art certainly reflects the excitement and individual thinking that took hold in that era. Kurtz, Lamantia and Theobald are also friends who’ve known each other a long time and studied at the Art Institute together. Their collective works, though varied and highly individual, share one important quality: Strength.

 


 

PERSONA

A Selection of Portraits and People

Coming March 2017

2335M Guiramand.jpg

UPWIND

Paintings by Chuck Walker

June 1- July 29, 2016

In the artist’s words:

“I am not a realist. My work has been described as psychological and emotional realism, but my work is more than that. It is thought symbolized into an icon, an idol. A pure image. I think of my paintings as road signs that mark out the directions and stops of my life as I go along. I have the need to paint like this.”

Chuck Walker’s work is reminiscent of 19th century French intimism. Walker’s paintings draw you in and work their magic on you almost in spite of yourself.  The images are sensual and intimate without being erotic, almost intrusive.  The paintings are encapsulated in layers;  the colors are soulful and melancholy. The result is quiet, yet powerful. Often Walker doesn’t show the face of the subject. As Walker states, “As soon as the face enters in it gets more specific, like a portrait.  People read the face.”   

Chuck Walker originally attended the School of the Art Institute of Chicago from 1969-73.  His works are in numerous private and public collections including the Museum of Contemporary Art (Chicago), Tampa Museum of Art (Florida), Contemporary Center for Art (St. Louis), Evanston Art Center (Illinois), and Artspace (San Francisco).  Walker's work has been discussed and reviewed in Art News, New Art Examiner, Chicago Tribune, Chicago Sun-Times, NewCity and Art in America.

 Madron Gallery is proud to present the work of Chuck Walker to our friends and clients.  We hope that you enjoy our exhibition.

Click to download a catalog of thumbnails.

For more information, please contact Madron at 312.640.1302 or info@madrongallery.com.


 

PHOTOGRAPHS BY MARISA SCHEINFELD

February 1- March 31, 2016

From the 1920s through the 1960s, the Catskill Mountains of New York were a popular vacation destination for millions of Americans especially Jewish vacationers. Known as the Borscht Belt, the region combined recreational activities with nighttime entertainment, especially stand-up comedy, which was born in the region’s theaters and showrooms. Many of these entertainers became household names in American culture. At its peak the Borscht Belt was comprised of over 500 hotels and 50,000 bungalows. Photographer Marisa Scheinfeld has been documenting the dramatic degradation of some of the most famous Borscht Belt hotels and colonies. The images reveal ghostly remnants of the glory years of the era, as well as powerful evidence of nature's claim on the resorts and their landscapes, and new uses to which the spaces have been put in recent years. Scheinfeld, who grew up in the region, began her documentary photo project in 2010. In the fall of 2016, Cornell University Press will publish a monograph of Marisa's photographs on the Borscht Belt. An exhibition is now on view through March 31 at Madron Gallery in Chicago. For more information, please contact Madron at 312.640.1302 or info@madrongallery.com.

Click to download a catalog of thumbnails.

The Borscht Belt: Revisiting the Remains of America's Jewish Vacationland was developed & created by Yeshiva University Museum in NYC


MARC HAUSER, VISIONS OF HIS CAREER

An Exhibition of Marc Hauser's Photography -  October 1 - December 4, 2015

Click to download a catalog of thumbnails   MARC HAUSER, VISIONS OF HIS CAREER:  CUBA-1983 AND SCENES OF AMERICAN LIFE                 To open the fall art season, Madron Gallery will host a two-part exhibition displaying the work of visionary photographer Marc Hauser.    CUBA-1983 The first part of the show will feature a collection of pictures shot in Cuba that haven’t been seen since 1983, when a Chicago restaurateur hired Hauser to travel to the communist country and take photographs to be featured in a Cuban and cigar-themed restaurant. Because of severe travel restrictions imposed by both the United States and Cuban governments, he had to first fly to Mexico and obtain a Mexican passport, then take a Soviet airline from Mexico to Cuba.  In Hauser’s own words: “When I got there, I stayed at the Hotel Nacional and spent a week in Havana taking photos of street scenes and the Partagas Cigar Factory, the most famous cigar factory in Cuba.  We needed a tour guide to get around and secured one through Castro’s administration.  I’ll never forget the guide telling us, ‘If you can’t speak Spanish, keep your mouth shut.’  I remember the poverty everywhere and no commerce.”  When Hauser returned to Chicago, he crafted four-by-six-foot silver prints from the negatives shot on the Cuban trip, and the photos were hung in the restaurant. After the restaurant closed in the mid-1980s, the whereabouts of those pictures became a mystery.  The photographs in this exhibition were printed from the same negatives shot in 1983: this is the first public display of any of these images since the restaurant closed. These photographs serve as a post-revolution time capsule from our close neighbor to the south with whom we have had little contact over the last half century. All of the Cuban pictures and most of Hauser’s classic images were shot with natural light or a single light source, but this alone is not what makes his photographs so compelling. As Hauser said in a 1985 Chicago Reader interview: “What makes my photographs is not the technical part.  I’m no technician.  What makes my pictures is me.  People come in to see me, and I break down their walls.  They open up and show that little sparkle in their eyes, or whatever’s in their eyes.” There is, indeed, much of Hauser in every picture he has taken, especially in these Cuban scenes.     SCENES OF AMERICAN LIFE The second part of the show combs Hauser’s extensive archives for selected images from across America. The Cuban pictures were shot in 1983 and they appear older and more sorrowful then pictures that were shot thirty years ago.  Their vintage quality exemplifies Cuba’s isolation from the rest of the world. At about the same time he shot the Cuban pictures, Hauser was in the midst of photographing iconic scenes of American life that would showcase the materialistic transformations in our country during the 1970s and 1980s.  Part of this series, his celebrity photographs always appear bright, fresh and personal.  The Woody Allen image, for which Mr. Allen allowed Hauser to take only two shots and which ended up as a Canadian magazine cover, is a perfect example of the simplicity of natural light and showing Hauser’s gift of depicting a sitter’s inner soul. The pictures of rock singer John Mellencamp’s Scarecrow album cover were also shot in natural light at Mellencamp’s farm in Indiana over the course of a week.  The penetrating portraits of singer Patti Smith were shot with a single light source and speak volumes about her offbeat character and her eccentric personality.  His list of celebrity clients fill many pages. Hauser is more than just a celebrity photographer. His photos of everyday people and everyday objects contain just as much intensity as his celebrity work. For instance, his portrait of an adolescent Boy Scout displays as much personality as a celebrity picture. The image of the old men on the boardwalk at Coney Island shows activity and communication in a still photograph. From this photograph we get a sense of Hauser’s ability to capture the essence of random people’s lives. There is a palpable sense of isolation in the picture of the Airstream trailer parked at the beach on a bright gray day, even with the Chicago skyline in the background. Hauser’s pictures of everyday street scenes also capture the personality of the moment even when they are void of human life.   Hauser is a master of natural and single-source lighting photography.  Alfred Stieglitz, one of the pioneers in elevating photography to an accepted art form, frequently used natural or simple lighting and once wrote that in photography “there is a reality – so subtle that it becomes more real than reality.”  We find that Hauser’s work frequently comes across as “more real than reality,” and trust that you will have a similar experience. It is our privilege and our pleasure to host this exhibition in our Chicago gallery.   

Click to download a catalog of thumbnails

 

MARC HAUSER, VISIONS OF HIS CAREER:

 CUBA-1983 AND SCENES OF AMERICAN LIFE  

 

            To open the fall art season, Madron Gallery will host a two-part exhibition displaying the work of visionary photographer Marc Hauser. 

 

CUBA-1983

The first part of the show will feature a collection of pictures shot in Cuba that haven’t been seen since 1983, when a Chicago restaurateur hired Hauser to travel to the communist country and take photographs to be featured in a Cuban and cigar-themed restaurant. Because of severe travel restrictions imposed by both the United States and Cuban governments, he had to first fly to Mexico and obtain a Mexican passport, then take a Soviet airline from Mexico to Cuba.  In Hauser’s own words: “When I got there, I stayed at the Hotel Nacional and spent a week in Havana taking photos of street scenes and the Partagas Cigar Factory, the most famous cigar factory in Cuba.  We needed a tour guide to get around and secured one through Castro’s administration.  I’ll never forget the guide telling us, ‘If you can’t speak Spanish, keep your mouth shut.’  I remember the poverty everywhere and no commerce.” 

When Hauser returned to Chicago, he crafted four-by-six-foot silver prints from the negatives shot on the Cuban trip, and the photos were hung in the restaurant. After the restaurant closed in the mid-1980s, the whereabouts of those pictures became a mystery.  The photographs in this exhibition were printed from the same negatives shot in 1983: this is the first public display of any of these images since the restaurant closed. These photographs serve as a post-revolution time capsule from our close neighbor to the south with whom we have had little contact over the last half century.

All of the Cuban pictures and most of Hauser’s classic images were shot with natural light or a single light source, but this alone is not what makes his photographs so compelling. As Hauser said in a 1985 Chicago Reader interview: “What makes my photographs is not the technical part.  I’m no technician.  What makes my pictures is me.  People come in to see me, and I break down their walls.  They open up and show that little sparkle in their eyes, or whatever’s in their eyes.” There is, indeed, much of Hauser in every picture he has taken, especially in these Cuban scenes.  

 

SCENES OF AMERICAN LIFE

The second part of the show combs Hauser’s extensive archives for selected images from across America.

The Cuban pictures were shot in 1983 and they appear older and more sorrowful then pictures that were shot thirty years ago.  Their vintage quality exemplifies Cuba’s isolation from the rest of the world. At about the same time he shot the Cuban pictures, Hauser was in the midst of photographing iconic scenes of American life that would showcase the materialistic transformations in our country during the 1970s and 1980s.  Part of this series, his celebrity photographs always appear bright, fresh and personal.  The Woody Allen image, for which Mr. Allen allowed Hauser to take only two shots and which ended up as a Canadian magazine cover, is a perfect example of the simplicity of natural light and showing Hauser’s gift of depicting a sitter’s inner soul. The pictures of rock singer John Mellencamp’s Scarecrow album cover were also shot in natural light at Mellencamp’s farm in Indiana over the course of a week.  The penetrating portraits of singer Patti Smith were shot with a single light source and speak volumes about her offbeat character and her eccentric personality.  His list of celebrity clients fill many pages.

Hauser is more than just a celebrity photographer. His photos of everyday people and everyday objects contain just as much intensity as his celebrity work. For instance, his portrait of an adolescent Boy Scout displays as much personality as a celebrity picture. The image of the old men on the boardwalk at Coney Island shows activity and communication in a still photograph. From this photograph we get a sense of Hauser’s ability to capture the essence of random people’s lives. There is a palpable sense of isolation in the picture of the Airstream trailer parked at the beach on a bright gray day, even with the Chicago skyline in the background. Hauser’s pictures of everyday street scenes also capture the personality of the moment even when they are void of human life.

 

Hauser is a master of natural and single-source lighting photography.  Alfred Stieglitz, one of the pioneers in elevating photography to an accepted art form, frequently used natural or simple lighting and once wrote that in photography “there is a reality – so subtle that it becomes more real than reality.”  We find that Hauser’s work frequently comes across as “more real than reality,” and trust that you will have a similar experience. It is our privilege and our pleasure to host this exhibition in our Chicago gallery. 

 

Note: Images on this page may be cropped. This page and thumbnail contain only a partial sample of our Hauser inventory.


AN EXHIBITION: JOHN A. KURTZ  June 1-July 31, 2015

The original paintings by John A. Kurtz are so full of detail that you can never seem to notice everything in one viewing. As a master of color and technique, Kurtz draws the viewer in through sheer intricacy, brilliant color and well-balanced compositional chaos.


 AMERICAN OILS

 October 23, 2014

Come join us at Madron Gallery for a tasting of some of our favorite American Olive Oils surrounded by the beauty of American Art!  City Olive is a specialty olive oil, gourmet foods boutique based in the heart of Chicago’s Roscoe Village and Andersonville neighborhoods. They offer a meticulous selection of the finest ESTATE BOTTLED extra virgin olive oils, as well as olives, vinegars, tapenades, spices, pastas, mustards and other gourmet items from around the world. Join us for wine and light hors d'oeuvres as we feast our eyes and palate on American oils!  Thursday, October 23rd from 6:00-8:00pm - THIRD FLOOR  FREE PARKING - Entrance between Peet's coffee and West Elm

Come join us at Madron Gallery for a tasting of some of our favorite American Olive Oils surrounded by the beauty of American Art!  City Olive is a specialty olive oil, gourmet foods boutique based in the heart of Chicago’s Roscoe Village and Andersonville neighborhoodsThey offer a meticulous selection of the finest ESTATE BOTTLED extra virgin olive oils, as well as olives, vinegars, tapenades, spices, pastas, mustards and other gourmet items from around the world. Join us for wine and light hors d'oeuvres as we feast our eyes and palate on American oils!

 Thursday, October 23rd from 6:00-8:00pm - THIRD FLOOR

 FREE PARKING - Entrance between Peet's coffee and West Elm


Click to download a catalog of thumbnails.

Click to download a catalog of thumbnails.

THE URBAN EXPERIENCE

April 14 through May 31, 2014 

The center of civility in our society is not the small town but the big city, where you learn to thread your way through heavy traffic and subdue your aggressiveness and extend kindness to strangers.

Garrison Keillor
A Prairie Home Companion Jan. 12, 2010

 

According to a recent article in The New York Times, for the first time in recorded history most people on our planet live in cities.  THE URBAN EXPERIENCE is a glimpse into the range and variety that city life offers both residents and visitors.  This exhibition is but a small sample of city life in the first half of the twentieth century. 

Cities are home to rich people and poor people and everyone in between.  The contrast in subject matter and mood could not be more conspicuous than considering the Park scene on a spring day by Harriette Bowdoin with the misery in Reginald Marsh’s Bowery scene.  Bernece Berkman gives us an industrial scene rendered in bright happy colors while Herman Menzel displays nothing but grime and gloom in his picture of Cal-Sag harbor. 

The serene gentility visible in Colin Campbell Cooper’s depiction of Hunter College is in sharp contrast to Jerome Myers Houston Street with a single woman walking to market on the lower East Side.   A wide range of styles are evident during this period.  Consider that Louis Lozowick’s modernist 57th Street (Rubber Center) and Harry Sternberg’s Elevated Platform were created at the same time. 

There are about thirty works in this exhibition which will be on display until May 31st.  A thumbnail catalog is attached and will be available during the show.